At a time where Foster The People are one of the biggest bands in the world and soul-pop king Mark Ronson reigns supreme, indie soul-pop duo Electric Guest are making their own mark with their debut album Mondo. Californian natives Asa Taccone and Matthew Compton produce a sound much bigger than you’d expect from a band consisting solely of two members.

Super-producer Danger Mouse may have had something to do with this, the man has a knack for creating a fuller sound for those that he works with, just ask The Black Keys. Danger Mouse started his relationship with the boys a few of years ago in 2007 but his biggest imprint on the band is on their debut full length LP.

Opener “Holes” sounds a lot like Hot Chip, there are a lot of synthesizer elements combined with a simple drum beat that makes for a very well-rounded and balanced track.  As the song progresses the sounds become more immersive as if a precursor of what's to come on the rest of the album.
The album's first single “This Head I Hold” is by far the catchiest song on the record, with the lo-fi/jazzy falsetto vocals and toe tapping drum beat, it's hard not to boogie as you're listening to the track - this is one to have on constant repeat.

The chugging bassline of “Awake”  leaves one humming along, with an equally catchy chorus to match,  it's a similar song in many respects to “Under The Gun”, group female vocals and all. Backup female vocals are constantly used throughout the album and to great effect. “Awake” is a tune to strut on the pavement to.

“Trouble Man” is the most complete song on the album, all nine minutes of it. With lyrics like “Me and my heart following the shadow she made,” it has a distinct, blues sensibility to it. And with an acoustic guitar chucked in for good measure, Danger Mouse may have had The Black Keys in mind when he was producing this one too.

The album as a whole is structured incredibly well and flows seamlessly from one track to the next, with the latter half of the album even stronger than the first.

With the band set to play one of our country's premier music festivals in Splendour In The Grass, the band certainly won't look out of place alongside names such as Jack White, The Kooks and Bloc Party.

by Jac Manuell