SYN Reviews: The Killers – Hisense Arena, 6th May 2018

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The Killers live at Hisense Arena, Sunday 6th May

Passes provided by PR

Words by India Weaver

 

After their stellar AFL Grand Final performance, the highly anticipated return of The Killers whisked Hisense Arena into an intense buzz of excitement on Sunday 6th May.

Jack Ladder & The Dreamlanders were given the delicate task of opening the night, soothing the audience into a deep groove. Ladder dipped into his new record Blue Poles, bringing the smooth sounds of ‘Susan’ into the live space. Despite the fact Ladder was without key members of The Dreamlanders, Kirin J Callinan and Donny Benét, his set perfectly paved the way for the pop-rock to come.

Jack Ladder remained on stage to play in the backing band for fellow Aussie, Alex Cameron. The stage was taken over by Cameron and his infectious funk. With his business partner and saxophonist, Roy Molloy, by his side, Cameron took rock and the audience into a new dimension of peachy rock.
He discussed his relationship with The Killer’s lead singer, Brandon Flowers, and how he emailed him during Cameron’s time in the US. A sweet story that made his appearance as support for the tour appropriate.

A long synth introduction spun the crowd into a state. The stage lit up with neon signs that paid homage to their Las Vegas roots. Opening with nothing more appropriate than the title track off their latest release, Wonderful Wonderful, The Killers began wetting the appetite of their audience, hungry for the iconic rock music they came for.
Brandon Flowers worked the stage, commanding the audience from all angles in a suave pink lurex suit jacket. Matching pink confetti cannons perfectly began ‘The Man’, consequentially encouraging squeals from the crowd that bounced off the walls. The punters in the mosh fist pumped in unison as the song built to the powerful final chorus of the song.

Brandon Flowers worked the stage, commanding the audience from all angles in a suave pink lurex suit jacket.

The energy of the crowd intensified as The Killers dove into the pool of what they know best- nostalgia. It was almost impossible to hear Flower’s voice as he eluded the audience to unite in shouting the chorus of ‘Somebody Told Me’.
As the band continued to move through their discography, it became extremely evident that Flowers is the perfect frontman. He can rock sequins, he can hold the audience in his hand, he is polite, talented and cool- all without the negative connotations of a rock ’n’ roll lifestyle. This was only further solidified when he took a moment to enlighten the audience on one of his favourite quotes…

“There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self.”― Ernest Hemingway

His persona was made even more loveable when Flowers chose audience member, Ryan, to take the drums for ‘For Reasons Unknown’. The crowd intensely cheered on as Ryan took the stage to perform what he had obviously been preparing for his whole life- to drum with his favourite band. Unlike other bands who take the stage, perform their songs as you hear them recorded and go home, The Killers understand their crowd. They understand the influence and importance of the music in the lives of their adoring fans. Each member of the band watched proudly as Ryan played and slayed.
Musical dreams continued to come true as the band dove back into their iconic songs, asking the crowd if they were ‘Human’ or dancers. The crowd defied the song and consequentially proved they are both.

The Killers continued to immerse their audience in their realm of nostalgic rock with well-known tunes ‘Runaways’ and ‘All These Things That I’ve Done’. These songs lead to a brief pause that was just long enough for Flowers to transform into a golden vision of rock- returning to the stage in a light gold suit covered in crystals. ‘The Calling’ was the soundtrack to Flower’s Elvis like moves, which made the suit even more fitting.
The dip into musical history continued as Alex Cameron and his suave saxophonist joined the band on stage to perform Men At Work’s ‘Who Can It Be Now’.

These songs lead to a brief pause that was just long enough for Flowers to transform into a golden vision of rock- returning to the stage in a light gold suit covered in crystals.

 

The band polished off the night with career-defining classic. ‘When You Were Young’ continued the theme of nostalgia, taking the audience back to their youth both figuratively and literally.
The unsurprising final song choice of Mr Brightside transformed every member of the audience into their own incarnation of Jack Riewoldt at the 2017 Grand Final. Richmond FC scarves were waved back and forth as the audience passionately shouted the lyrics.

The foundation of The Killers current identity is their ability to not only respect and embrace their nostalgic identity, but somehow weave it into their current material, expertly intertwining the old and new within live space. It was incredible to witness not only their music in person but to see their loyal fans in their element.

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